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  • Robin Yong

The Pied Piper - der Rattenfänger von Hameln 哈梅林嘅皮埃德·派珀



"Into the street the Piper stept,

Smiling first a little smile,

As if he knew what magic slept

In his quiet pipe the while;

Then, like a musical adept,

To blow the pipe his lips he wrinkled,

And green and blue his sharp eyes twinkled,

Like a candle-flame where salt is sprinkled;

And ere three shrill notes the pipe uttered,

You heard as if an army muttered;

And the muttering grew to a grumbling;

And the grumbling grew to a mighty rumbling;

And out of the houses the rats came tumbling.

Great rats, small rats, lean rats, brawny rats,

Brown rats, black rats, grey rats, tawny rats,

Grave old plodders, gay young friskers,

Fathers, mothers, uncles, cousins,

Cocking tails and pricking whiskers,

Families by tens and dozens,

Brothers, sisters, husbands, wives --

Followed the Piper for their lives.

From street to street he piped advancing,

And step for step they followed dancing,

Until they came to the river Weser

Wherein all plunged and perished! " - Robert Browning, 1842


The Pied Piper of Hamelin (German: der Rattenfänger von Hameln, also known as the Pan Piper or the Rat-Catcher of Hamelin) is the title character of a legend from the town of Hamelin (Hameln), Lower Saxony, Germany.

The legend dates back to the Middle Ages, the earliest references describing a piper, dressed in multicolored ("pied") clothing, who was a rat catcher hired by the town to lure rats away with his magic pipe. When the citizens refuse to pay for this service as promised, he retaliates by using his instrument's magical power on their children, leading them away as he had the rats. This version of the story spread as folklore and has appeared in the writings of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, the Brothers Grimm, and Robert Browning, among others.

There are many contradictory theories about the Pied Piper. Some suggest he was a symbol of hope to the people of Hamelin, which had been attacked by plague; he drove the rats from Hamelin, saving the people from the epidemic.

In 1284, while the town of Hamelin was suffering from a rat infestation, a piper dressed in multicolored ("pied") clothing appeared, claiming to be a rat-catcher. He promised the mayor a solution to their problem with the rats. The mayor, in turn, promised to pay him for the removal of the rats (according to some versions of the story, the promised sum was 1,000 guilders). The piper accepted and played his pipe to lure the rats into the Weser River, where they all drowned.

Despite the piper's success, the mayor reneged on his promise and refused to pay him the full sum (reputedly reduced to a sum of 50 guilders) even going so far as to blame the piper for bringing the rats himself in an extortion attempt. Enraged, the piper stormed out of the town, vowing to return later to take revenge. On Saint John and Paul's day, while the adults were in church, the piper returned, dressed in green like a hunter and playing his pipe. In so doing, he attracted the town's children. One hundred and thirty children followed him out of town and into a cave, after which they were never seen again. Depending on the version, at most three children remained behind: one was lame and could not follow quickly enough, the second was deaf and therefore could not hear the music, and the last was blind and therefore unable to see where he was going. These three informed the villagers of what had happened when they came out from church.

Other versions relate that the Pied Piper led the children to the top of Koppelberg Hill, where he took them to a beautiful land, or a place called Koppenberg Mountain, or Transylvania, or that he made them walk into the Weser as he did with the rats, and they all drowned. Some versions state that the Piper returned the children after payment, or that he returned the children after the villagers paid several times the original amount of gold.


This is one of my very first photos at the Acqua Alta Libreria, and the start of my Fairy Tales in Venice series.

Venice is a real fairy city of the heart. The city is full of iconic churches, old palaces and vintage shops. There are no skyscrapers, no cars; except for the occasional sounds of the a boat's engine, it feels like time stopped here for a few hundred years now. The magic is enhanced during the Venice Carnevale with the arrival of the masked costumers. Fairy Tale characters are popular themes amongst the costumed revellers. Rita is a popular mask costumer from Germany and her most popular costume being the Pied Piper. After a few encounters with Rita at various masked gatherings, I finally summoned the courage to ask her out for a photo session at the Acqua Alta Libreria - an iconic location in Venice. As usual, only natural lighting and just a few very quick shots as this place is infested with tourists during this very busy festival. The photo became the cover picture for my photo book "Fairy Tales in Venice".


The book is available for purchase at Blurb bookstore, Amazon and Apple's iBookstore:


https://www.blurb.com/b/6436547-fairy-tales-in-venice


https://www.amazon.com/Fairy-Tales-Venice-Robin-Yong/dp/1320378943/ref=sr_1_6?crid=26YWOOMBXMZTZ&keywords=robin+yong&qid=1653117698&sprefix=robin+youn%2Caps%2C604&sr=8-6


https://books.apple.com/us/book/fairy-tales-in-venice/id1040151398



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